Search Locations
Find Us
Open 7 Days a Week

Know the History and What Were Beagles Bred For

A Brief History of Beagles: From Hunters to Family Dogs

With big floppy ears and the signature multi-colored coat — Beagles are just as fun-
loving and sweet as they appear! If you are looking to welcome a new pup into your
family, a Beagle could be an excellent choice. This breed is loving, curious, and
extremely loyal — you’ll never have a dull day with a Beagle in your home.
shutterstock_273373859

What Were Beagles Bred For?

With a short yet sturdy body, this breed is built to be the ultimate hunting
companion. Due to their keen sense of smell, Beagles were originally bred as hound
dogs for hunting small game. Interestingly, the pups were being bred for specific
hunting needs; they were taller in Europe for fox hunting and smaller in the United
States to hunt rabbits.

History of Beagles

The history of the Beagle is not as precise as some other breeds we have profiled.
While ancient Greek documents place Beagle-like dogs as far back as 400 B.C., the
breed, as we know it now, was not formally recognized until the 19th century. During
this time, Beagles were very popular in England, and it wasn’t much longer before
the breed became a favorite in the United States. The American Kennel Club (AKC)
started recognizing the Beagle as a breed in 1884. Today, they are a consistently
popular choice for family dogs, appearing regularly on the AKC’s Top Ten Most
Popular Dog Breeds.

Different Beagle Breeds

While there is technically only one breed of Beagle, there are two different varieties
of Beagles that are recognized by the American Kennel Club. The only feature that
separates the two varieties is their size. One type stands below 13 inches tall while
the other stands between 13 to 15 inches tall. Other than the slight difference in
height, no other physical or personality traits differ between these two varieties of
Beagles. Both types can — and should — weigh anywhere between 18 and 30 pounds.
Since this breed is susceptible to weight problems in their old age, it’s important
to maintain their activity levels as they age.

Beagles are black, brown, and white in color and are relatively easy to care for in
regards to grooming. A proper brushing once a week will cut down on the amount
of bathing they need unless they are used for hunting. They do, however, need to
have their ears checked frequently to help avoid infections.

Beagle Behavior

Beagles do best in homes that have backyards, allowing them the freedom to
wander around. While all dogs should be microchipped, it’s very important for
Beagles because their mischievous behavior can get the best of them. Beagles
follow their noses, so if they escape the yard, they can wander further from
home in pursuit of whatever scent is enticing them. Do your best to get them
outside and exercising, which should cut down on some of their pent-up energy and
keep them on their best behavior in the house.

Beagles of all ages do well in homes with adults, kids, and other pets. They are at
their best in extremely social settings and typically do not like being left home
alone. If they become bored, they will find things to occupy their time until you
return, which can include chewing shoes and furniture.

Beagles are a smart, curious, and energetic breed that packs a lot of love and
sweetness into a small package. Caution: don’t think there won’t be moments where
you are driven utterly crazy by their mischievous behavior! Please remember —
purebred Beagles are popular and lucrative “products” for puppy mills. There are
many wonderful Beagle rescue organizations and animal advocates working hard to
prevent the puppy mills from mass breeding. Consider adopting from a local Beagle
rescue.

Signature Siamese Persian Cat Personality Traits

Siamese Persian Cats: From Royalty to Disney Movie Stars & Beyond

shutterstock_134696735

Despite how the Disney movie The Lady and The Tramp may have depicted this breed,
Siamese Persian cats are actually very loving, social, and outgoing. These cats are truly
elegant looking with their sleek bodies and beautiful eyes. They’re known as a natural
breed, having evolved through the ages, first appearing in a Thai manuscript of cat
poems believed to date as far back as the 14th century. Today, the Siamese cat has
contributed key features and personality traits to related breeds such as the Balinese,
the Oriental (the Himalayan division of the Persian), the Tonkinese, and the Havana
Brown.

History of the Siamese Persian Cat

The history of the Siamese Persian cat is just as storied. As one of the oldest breeds of cat,
the Siamese Persian was indigenous to Siam (known today as Thailand) for thousands of
years. It is believed that in the earliest days, Siamese cats were bred and reserved for Thai
royalty. The Siamese breed itself was not introduced to the West until the nineteenth
century. In 1878, the first Siamese Persian cat was introduced to the U.S. by a diplomat
stationed at the consulate in Bangkok, who gifted “Siam” to First Lady Mrs. Rutherford B.
Hayes.

Siamese Persian Cats: The Purrfect Personalities

The Siamese Persian breed’s striking features and loving personalities have seen its
popularity continue to grow in the United States. Along with their beautiful looks,
Siamese Persian cats have a personality that encompasses everything a cat lover would
look for in a feline friend! Being social and extremely vocal is in their nature, and it shows
in their day-to-day activity. They usually enjoy being with people and are known to
follow you around “talking” and “helping” wherever they can! Siamese Persian cats are
also great with children and dogs who like cats.

Caring for a Siamese Persian Cat

Overall, the care for these beautiful cats is straightforward. Siamese Persian cats are
typically indoor cats, so that adds to the ease of keeping them clean. They have short
hair and only require monthly brushing to remove any loose hair. They tend to be very
healthy, but collectively as a breed, they struggle with asthma and congenital heart
defects.

The Siamese Persian loves to stay active, which contributes to their sleek body type. It is
recommended to have plenty of physical activities to keep them busy while you are
away, such as tall climbing trees and plenty of interactive toys. It has also been
mentioned that they love to play fetch if trained to do so!

So, if you are looking for a social and talkative feline to add to your family, the Siamese
Persian could be an excellent breed for you! One note: if your schedule has you away
from home for long periods, cattime.com suggests getting two of them. Many do
not like being alone, and having a friend can keep them preoccupied until you
return.

Tips and Tricks on How to Train a Dog to Walk on and Off a Leash

Training Your Dog to Walk on and off a Leash

No matter what age, breed, or size, it’s important to teach your dog to walk on a leash. Good leash skills and mastery of basic commands are vital for your dog’s safety and your own.

First, the only real distinctions between teaching a puppy or an adult dog to walk on a leash are shorter training sessions for puppy attention spans, and the time it takes for them to get used to the leash, collar and even a harness. Once they’re used to the gear equipment, you can begin to leash train your dog. Puppy training sessions should be conducted in three- to five-minute training sessions a few times each day, and most adult dogs can handle training for 10 minutes, anywhere from two-to-four times a day.

Before You Begin to Train a Dog to Walk on a Leash

Make sure your puppy or dog has an appropriate collar or harness that fits properly to prevent them from slipping out, as well as a suitable leash. A great way to help your pup get used to wearing a collar/harness and leash is to put both on for short periods of time in the house and during playtime. During this exercise, give him/her small treats and praise so he/she learns to love collar-and-leash time since it’s now associated with food and fun. Another thing to determine prior to training is your marker for good behavior. Here are the most common options:

● Get a training clicker so the dog learns to associate the sound with a reward
● Training treats are tiny tidbits to keep your pup interested in earning a reward
● Positive Verbal Reinforcement
.
Your pup dog wants to please you, so consistency in your training commands can help your furry friend quickly understand what you want him to do.

Whichever reward you use, the method can produce the same result. It’s recommended to conduct your first leash training session in a quiet place indoors that’s free of distractions. One of the best exercises to start with is “Sit-Stay-Come” training while still wearing their leash and collar. Even though you are not actually holding the leash and walking your pup just yet, it’s a great first step that allows dogs to associate the reward with wearing the collar and leash, making it more likely for them to listen to these commands while on a walk.

Start out by making the marker sound or offering a training treat, and as soon as your puppy dog
reacts by turning towards you or looking at you, reward him. Trust us, it won’t be
long before they understand the new game!

Keep this exercise going and continue backing away from your pup, make him come to you, then reward him. You can gradually increase the distance, and once he’s mastered coming to you, you can now actually pick up the leash and walk together for a bit before he gets the reward. Remember, puppies have a short attention span, so keep your training sessions short.

Tips & Training Guidelines to Teach Your Dog to Walk on a Leash

Now that your dog has collar-and-leash walking mastered indoors, it’s time to introduce a few more distractions by going outdoors. You can expect challenges and a few mistakes because all the sounds, smells, and sights will be intriguing and new to him. You want him to learn to walk on a leash nicely by your side, without pulling or lunging. Always remember that you are in control. Do not yank or jerk the leash in an attempt for control or drag your dog along with you.

● Be patient and keep your first walks together short. Keep your eyes on your dog so you can anticipate any behavior issues such as lunging at something.

● Use your marker sound to redirect his attention whenever he’s distracted or drifting too far away from the task at hand. Reward him with a treat for following you.

When walking outside with your pup, being proactive and trying to avoid distractions like bicyclists, skateboarders, other dogs, and cars is very important. If you see some improvement , you can increase the distance between you, your dog and whatever is distracting him. If your dog starts lunging at something or pulling in the other direction, stop in your tracks, stand very still and refuse to move until your dog comes back to you. Once he does, make your marker sound again and reward
him.

If barking while distracted is a problem, use the same process as you would if your dog is lunging or pulling — create distance and offer treats before he begins barking. Be consistent, and eventually every time he sees a dog he will know to turn his attention back towards you.

Tips & Training Guidelines to Teach Your Dog to Walk Off-Leash

Let’s say that your dog has mastered walking on the leash. He’s healthy, even-
tempered and non-aggressive. You can trust him to come to you on command. Is it
enough for you to trust him to walk off-leash? The safety of you, your pet, and
others around you is always important to keep in mind, and that’s why we don’t
recommend off-leash walks with your pup. However, there are a few environments
distinctly designed for some off-leash fun in a fenced and controlled area. Working
with your dog to help prepare for these types of environments to ensure your pup
still follows your commands is a great idea. Here are some ways to safely work on off-leash training!

If you decide to begin off-leash training, know it is going to take firm, consistent training and lots of
positive behavior reinforcement. Your dog must stay right by your side or under your
voice control at all times when it is off the leash, even when distractions are
everywhere. Make sure your dog is micro-chipped and ID tags are current. If your dog gets away from you, ID tags and microchips will be your best bet at reunification.

If your dog is ready, the dog park can be an option as a place to practice being off-leash. You can test your voice control commands and his/her response, as well as see how your dog behaves when distractions are everywhere. Your dog should always follow your direction no matter the situation or distraction. If your pup is not responding well and does not maneuver around the dog park by your side while obeying commands, it may be beneficial to practice those commands some more at home on a leash with fewer distractions. If your pup does well at listening to commands at the dog park while sticking by your side, you can allow them to begin exploring interesting smells, running freely, and playing with other dogs in ways they can’t at home or while on-leash, and generally have some fun!

The best part? Your dog can develop more confidence while earning your trust. If you feel it’s appropriate, you can tackle more challenging situations each time, until you’re able to trust your dog and his behavior virtually anywhere it’s appropriate for him to be. Remember, consistent, positive reinforcement punctuated with random treats helps promote good behavior, build skills and good canine citizens.

Finally, if you’re worried about your dog’s weight or fear spoiling him with too many treats, enthusiastic praise (i.e. “Yes!”) is another type of reward for good behavior. You can mix it up so he never knows which he’ll get – food or praise. Both feel good to him because he’s pleasing you, and you are rewarding his good behavior.

We hope this gives you what you need to help begin leash training your furry family member! Happy walking!

Dog Park Etiquette

Proper ways to run, play, and behave at your local dog parks

 

With temperatures cooling down, now is the best time to take your dog to the dog park. While rough-and-tumble is generally accepted between dogs, there are a few things that owners should still keep in mind. Here are a few tips to ensure the dog park is a fun and enjoyable place for dogs to roam freely.

Follow the Rules

Maricopa County requires that all dogs be licensed and that any dog over 4 months of age is current on their shots. Before venturing out to play, it’s essential to make sure your dog’s license and vaccinations are up-to-date. Contact your veterinarian to schedule an annual exam and ensure your dog’s license is renewed.

Any dog over the age of 3 months is additionally required to wear a collar or harness with a valid license tag. Tags help identify your four-legged friend in case they wander off during playtime or get lost.

Many designated off-leash dog parks have their own rules, but some general rules apply to every park. Arizona State law requires all dogs to be on a leash until they’re inside a park’s off-leash area, and the gates are completely closed. It’s recommended to first familiarize your dog with other dogs while on a leash before letting your pet run freely.

Keep it Clean

Making a visit to your area park (or neighborhood sidewalk) shows us that some people need to be reminded to clean up after their pets! Always bring a waste bag with you as a backup in case the park doesn’t supply bags (or they’ve run out for the day). In addition to being courteous, cleaning up decreases the spread of water contamination and infectious diseases.

Some cities have even taken matters into their own hands to make owners responsible for cleaning up after their pets. Mesa, for instance, enacted a city ordinance requiring owners to pick up dog waste and subjecting violators to fines. Regardless of your city, be courteous of parks and others – always scoop the poop.

Stay Alert

We’ve all seen it: the owners who are so immersed in texting, reading, or a phone call while their dog is doing something wildly inappropriate. at the dog park. We all don’t want to be that person!

Visits to the dog park are a great way to meet fellow pet owners and make new furry friends. When mingling, it’s important to stay alert and not get too caught up in those distractions. As a pet owner, you are personally liable for your pet’s conduct at all times and can be responsible for any damages or injuries caused if your dog harms another dog or person. It only takes a minute for a fun, playful scene to turn awry, so always be on the lookout for those behaviors!

Behave Politely

Even as a regular visitor to the dog park, you never know what to expect from other dogs and their owners. Overeager playmates. Bullies and ball hogs. With so many individuals and dogs sharing space, there’s always the potential for conflict. It’s essential to train your dog to respond to commands, even in a distracting situation. This training can help quickly defuse potential conflicts. Teach your dog to sit or stand still when meeting new people and dogs.

If you witness your dog being territorial, marking excessively, stealing toys, ganging up on or rushing other dogs, put a stop to their behavior immediately. Leashing up and leaving the park is an excellent way to make sure things don’t escalate while teaching your pet that bad behavior has consequences.

Contact your veterinarian for recommendations on trainers and resources to work through aggressive and antisocial behaviors.

Phoenix Dog Parks 

Now that you’ve reviewed the dog park etiquette rules let’s get out and play. Need suggestions on a dog park in your area? Check out our list of Phoenix dog parks below:

  • RJ Dog Park at Pecos Park on 48th Street and Pecos Parkway is named after RJ, a police service dog killed in duty. Two acres of grass are divided to provide areas for small and large dogs. Fully fenced and ADA accessible, owners give this park high reviews for cleanliness, ample shaded seating, and friendliness of other patrons.
  • Steele Indian School Dog Park is open from 6 AM-10 PM every day at 300 East Indian School Road in Phoenix. The park includes paw-shaped pathways, chilled drinking fountains, waste bag dispensers, and ADA-compliant double-gated entrances. As with other Phoenix dog parks, they may close to allow turf to dry appropriately after heavy rainfall.
  • Cesar Chavez Dog Park is located in South Mountain. The park is open from 5:30 a.m. to 11:45 p.m., giving you plenty of time to take your dog out before or after working hours. If you’re wanting to take your dog for a scenic walk, the Alvord Lake Path located next to the park is a great place to stretch your legs.
  • Margaret Hance dog park, located in the northwest section of Margaret T. Hance Park between 3rd and 5th Avenue prioritizes your dog’s safety. That’s why this unique park separates its playing area into two regions: one for smaller dogs and one for bigger dogs.
  • Paradise Valley Dog Park is the perfect place for family and dogs alike to get outside and play. Featuring 2.4 acres of grass and 2 shade ramadas, owners can watch as their furry pals bound across the gated fields. Another perk? There are benches, tables, and drinking fountains.

Have you been to the dog park lately? If so, what tips can you share about local parks and park etiquette? We look forward to your comments!

Benefits of Acupuncture for Pets and What It Treats

Acupuncture therapy for pets: What does it treat?

Acupuncture has been steadily gaining popularity among individuals seeking alternative treatment for various medical issues, including pain, headaches, and blood pressure problems. The ancient Chinese practice utilizes needles to stimulate specific points of the body, which increases blood flow in those target areas; triggering the body’s natural painkillers.

Now, as more pet owners search for holistic methods to lessen their furry friends’ ailments, many are turning to pet acupuncture to ease pain and discomfort. It’s all about giving pets the tools to live happier and fuller lives!

What are the benefits of acupuncture for pets? 

Proper acupuncture that’s performed by a certified veterinary acupuncturist can provide numerous health benefits for your beloved pet. You may want to consider this form of natural treatment if your furry friend is suffering from discomfort, whether it’s musculoskeletal, respiratory, skin, or gastrointestinal.

In veterinary medicine, acupuncture has been successfully used as a complementary treatment for the following medical problems:

  • Arthritis or degenerative joint disease
  • Allergic dermatitis and other skin disorders
  • Respiratory disease
  • Pain control
  • Gastrointestinal disorders
  • Neurological diseases such as paresis, paralysis, or back issues
  • Behavioral problems
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Reducing pain after surgery

Will my pet be uncomfortable?

It’s easy to assume that acupuncture can be an uncomfortable or even painful experience for your pet. Acupuncture utilizes thin and lightweight needles, so it’s unlikely your pet will feel much during the treatment, which lasts between 5 and 30 minutes. While many pets require gentle restraint during a session, as the patient adapts to the treatment, less restraint may be necessary. Some pet owners have found that their pup or feline have even fallen asleep during the treatment!

Although pet acupuncture is not meant as a replacement for general veterinary medicine or other medical procedures, acupuncture may be an ideal complement to your pet’s treatments and medicines. With pet acupuncture, it’s important to be patient as it’s not a ‘one size fits all’ approach. The goal is for your pet to remain symptom-free between each session.

The number of acupuncture sessions recommended by your veterinarian will vary depending on the condition being treated. It may take several pet acupuncture sessions before you notice a significant change in your pet’s demeanor or apparent pain level. Most patients will see a positive response after 4 to 8 treatments. Others with conditions like arthritis may require regular sessions year-round to maintain the positive results. However, each case is unique to a pet and their specific needs. Talk with your veterinarian to determine what to expect from acupuncture treatments.

Are you interested in trying acupuncture for your beloved pet? Find a location near you and set up an appointment for a consultation!

Disclaimer: Not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may have regarding the medical condition of your pet. If you think your pet has a medical emergency, call or visit your veterinarian or your local veterinary emergency hospital immediately.