Author Archives: AZPetVet

Mask Policy Update: 3/31/2021

MASK POLICY UPDATE: Recently, the Governor issued an Executive Order that lifted the state-wide mandate for masks. The order also encouraged businesses to follow CDC guidelines for their employees and patrons, which currently recommend wearing masks at this time to continue to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. While we respect everyone’s personal choices surrounding this matter, the nature of our jobs require that we work in close proximity of each other and our clients; therefore believe it is in the best interest of our business to follow CDC guidelines and continue wearing masks for the time being. We will revisit this policy once we have more time and information to evaluate the impact the executive order has on our community. In the meantime, we simply ask that while you are providing us the privilege of helping to ensure the health and wellbeing of your pet, that you also respect our masking policy.

We understand that this has been a trying time for all involved, and we are ready to get back to normal as soon as possible! We’re working hard to create processes that will allow us to do so, and are confident that within a short time we will return to normal if we all work together. We are very excited to see your smiling faces again soon! Thank you for your continued support.

Why Preventive Health Care for Pets Is Important 

health care for pets
Health Care for Pets – Why Pet Preventive Care Matters
Health care for pets, including pet preventive care, matters a great deal to  companion animals. Your family pet’s health care plan should incorporate regular  check-ups, pet dental care, and grooming to keep them looking and feeling their  best. Good pet preventive care helps maximize our faithful companions’ health,  wellness, and quality of life, which is what every pet parent wants for their furry  friends.
Like people, dogs are living longer. And like people, dogs are at risk for developing  age-related illnesses and issues like arthritis, diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease,  and cancer. Regular pet preventive care helps your vet identify your pet’s particular  risk factors – whether it’s age, lifestyle, weight, or genetics, and quickly get on top of  any problem. Early detection of disease and intervention allows you and your vet to  decide the best course of care for your pet.
Pet preventive care often includes lifestyle and/or dietary changes and may  incorporate medication, especially as your pet ages and risk factors increase. Cats are often overlooked for preventive care, but they need regular wellness checks, too!  Your veterinarian will likely recommend annual wellness programs for your pet,  including routine blood work to monitor for potential problems. Some pets may  require more frequent veterinary health checks depending on their age and overall  condition. Naturally, older pets should see the vet more frequently.

Creating a Family Pet Health Care Plan 
The core of your pet’s preventive care plan should include complete wellness exams  by a veterinary professional. According to the ​Merck Veterinary Manual​,
“​Adult dogs​ should have a complete veterinary examination at least once a year.  Puppies need veterinary visits usually every 3 to 4 weeks until they are about 4  months old. Geriatric dogs (older than 7 to 8 years old) should see their veterinarian  twice a year or more frequently because illness is more common in older pets, and it  can be identified sooner.​”
“​Adult cats ​should have a complete veterinary examination at least once a year.  Kittens need veterinary visits usually every 3 to 4 weeks until they are about 4  months old. Geriatric cats (older than 8 to 9 years old) should see their veterinarian  twice a year or more frequently because illness is more common in older pets, and  should be identified sooner to provide proper treatment.”

Key Tips for Pet Preventive Care  
Your veterinarian will recommend timelines for your pet’s core vaccines and dental  care. Routine veterinary preventive care for your pets should include the following  items, as well as any additional health screens recommended by your veterinarian,  tailored for your pet’s specific needs.
● Vaccinations
● Parasite control
● Dental care
● Grooming
● Stool screening
● Bloodwork
● Heartworm testing

Finally, if you have questions about preventive pet care or your cat or dog’s health,  give your vet a call. Don’t have a regular vet? AZPetVet has 21 convenient locations  around the Valley. Find an AZPetVet location near you ​here​.

[Disclaimer]
Not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or  treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may  have regarding the medical condition of your pet. If you think your pet has a  medical emergency, call or visit your veterinarian or your local veterinary  emergency hospital immediately.  

An Important Update: 12/16/2020

To Our Amazing AZPetVet Clients:

The health and safety of your family and pets, as well as our team members is our highest priority. As always, we are dedicated to providing you with great service and care that you have come to expect from our hospitals. Our efforts to keep everyone safe and prevent the spread of COVID-19 includes:

SERVICE PROTOCOLS: 

  • CURBSIDE APPOINTMENTS – ALL NON-CRITICAL APPOINTMENTS: In almost all situations we will be providing curbside appointments. When you arrive for your appointment, please remain in your car and call or text our practice on your cell phone. Please note, the hospital’s text number is different from the phone line. To verify the text number, feel free to give us a call. We will walk you through what that process will look like for both you and your pet. Please limit the number of people at your veterinary appointments to one person if possible. We ask that our clients join us in wearing masks during all contact with our medical team including outdoors.
  • FOOD OR MEDICATION PICKUP: Please contact us to request any needed refills on medications or food. If you are picking up food or medications, please call when you arrive, and we will deliver these items directly to your car. We ask that our clients join us in wearing masks during all contact with our medical team. You may also request refills on medication or food through our online pharmacy and have them shipped right to your door; you can find a link on all of our hospital websites.

CLEANING/SAFETY PROTOCOLS:

  • Our team members continue to follow the highest standard of cleaning and disinfecting within the hospital, as well as specific hygiene protocols throughout their shifts. Employees are not reporting to work if they are experiencing any illness or respiratory symptoms and are following their doctor’s recommendations for medical care and quarantine.


Continued Precautions

Our team members will be wearing masks when interacting with any clients or fellow team members. Our smiles are still underneath though! We ask that our clients join us in wearing masks during all contact with our medical team.

We continue to advise any team members who have a fever or are experiencing any illness or symptoms to stay home. We ask that our clients continue to do this as well.

We sincerely appreciate how supportive you have been as we navigate through this pandemic together. Please do not hesitate to reach out to any of our hospitals with any questions or concerns you may have. We are here to support the health and safety of your family and pets!

Sincerely,

The AZPetVet Family of Animal Hospitals

Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week – September 20-26, 2020

Why You Should Consider Special Needs Animals for Adoption

 

Shelters and rescues are packed with homeless pets. At AZPetVet, we work with many rescue groups and organizations around the Valley, such as LovePup, to help as many animals in need of adoption as we possibly can. The ASPCA estimates that around 6.5 million companion animals enter U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year – approximately 3.3 million dogs and 3.2 million cats. Each year, approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized (670,000 dogs and 860,000 cats). Special needs animals are consistently overlooked for adoption simply because so many people prefer to adopt cute puppies and kittens.

If you search ‘animals up for adoption near me’, you’ll get a huge string of results from all sorts of shelter and rescue organizations vying for your attention. All of them have pets that have been waiting weeks, months, and sometimes years to find their fur-ever homes. Typically, ‘less adoptable’ refers to animals in some unique categories including special needs and even hair color. While the term ‘special needs’ might sound intimidating, it’s a category term for pets who may need a little extra care. Physical disability, behavior, chronic illness, or medical conditions can all put an animal into this category, reducing their chance of finding a home. That’s why PetFinder.com created ‘Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week’ – to help raise awareness of these wonderful animals who are too often overlooked. Here, we’ll highlight the most common types of special needs pets and the reasons you may want to consider them.

Older Dogs

Senior pets end up in shelters for a variety of reasons. Some may have health conditions that can be managed with diet and medications, others are perfectly healthy. Sometimes, the owner can no longer afford to care for them, becomes ill, moves, or just doesn’t want a pet anymore. Given the chance, older dogs can adapt to a new home and family, and become wonderful companion animals for families. Older dogs are especially great for individuals that enjoy a more relaxed lifestyle, as they require a lot less exercise, and are often just happy to curl up next to their beloved person. Many people prefer to skip the rambunctiousness, potty training, and additional training that comes with adopting a puppy or kitten. Older pets usually know basic commands and tend to be more mellow, so they’re ideal for senior citizens. And yes, old dogs can learn new tricks – it’s just a matter of working with them to develop new habits. Positive reinforcement is the best approach. The Arizona Humane Society even offers a Senior to Senior adoption program with discounted fees. Like people, older pets will require regular wellness checks to keep them healthy and happy for life, so this should also be considered when adopting a senior animal.

Pets With Medical Conditions

Many shelter dogs and cats have some form of short- or long-term medical condition, especially older animals. Younger animals with less developed immune systems, or that haven’t received the required vaccination series can contract diseases, like parvovirus, distemper, kennel cough, or Valley Fever. With the right family or individual, plus regular veterinary care, many health conditions can be managed through medications, lifestyle and dietary modifications, and some good old fashioned TLC. With the right treatment and care, most pets will enjoy a good quality of life for years to come with their new families.

Hearing loss or deafness is another reason people will overlook adoptable pets. Congenital deafness often occurs in predominantly white or merle-coated breeds like Dalmatians, Border Collies, Australian Shepherds, English Setters, white Boxers, and white Bull Terriers. While they may not be able to hear, most of these pets can learn simple sign language commands. Aside from the hearing loss, they’re still the same wonderful, loving creatures – they just need the chance to show it.

Behavior Problems

Just like people, no pet is perfect. Behavior problems are a common reason for people surrendering animals to a shelter or rescue. Pets with behavior problems have special needs, and require consistent, specialized training from a professional to get them back on track. Behavior issues can range from poor potty training, separation anxiety, or not getting along with other animals/children, to aggression. Many issues can be resolved with stability, consistent training, regular exercise and play, and of course, love.

Black Dogs & Cats

Research studies consistently show that black dogs and cats have a more difficult time getting adopted than others. Black dogs and cats are often left behind in shelters and rescues due to centuries of ingrained superstitions and old wives’ tales. The reality is that black dogs and cats are just as loveable as any other pet. While it may be harder to capture their cuteness and features in a photo without proper lighting, no matter what, black cats and dogs bring the same brand of goofy, unconditional love as other pets.

Remember, loving pets come in all shapes and sizes, colors, and breeds. Take some time to get to know one another when you’re looking for a new pet. You never know, it could be a loving match for life. Good luck in your search!

Need a good vet for your new pet? AZPetVet has 21 locations around the Valley. Click here to find a location near you.

Not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may have regarding the medical condition of your pet. If you think your pet has a medical emergency, call or visit your veterinarian or your local veterinary emergency hospital immediately.

 

 

 

When Do Puppies Lose Their Teeth?

Call the Tooth Fairy — Are Puppies Meant to Lose Teeth?

Fuzzy, cuddly, and adorable — it’s no doubt that having a puppy in the family can bring endless joy to your life! However, there is one aspect to puppies that can be a little less than pleasant — their teeth. These baby teeth are sharp like needles and can be a nightmare to your furniture, curtains, and shoes, as well as to your own arms and ankles. But remember… puppies will lose all of their baby teeth eventually.

When do puppies lose their teeth? It really depends on the breed and the dog, but puppies will generally start to lose their baby teeth at around four months old.

The Life Cycle of Puppy Teeth

For newborn pups, their teeth will typically start to grow in around two weeks old. You’ll be able to tell that your little pup is teething if they are drooling more or chewing on more things. These baby teeth can be very sharp and unpleasant. Since puppies drink their mom’s milk and then move to kibble, it may cause you to wonder why puppies have such sharp teeth in the first place. One common thought is that domestication has not fully impacted their teeth. Historically, wild dogs had to have razor-sharp teeth in order to tear into their first taste of meat. It’s also thought that sharp teeth will help with the weaning process, as well as teach bite inhibition.

Puppies start to lose their baby teeth at around four months old as their adult teeth begin to come in. Sometimes you may find that a baby tooth will be stubborn and will remain in their mouth… if this happens, you should consult your local veterinarian as the tooth might need to be extracted.

Do Puppies Lose All Baby Teeth?

Eventually, your pup will lose all 28 of its baby teeth. Due to the fact that these furry friends don’t eat much hard food and mainly drink their mother’s milk as pups, the baby teeth don’t include any grinding molars. Over the course of their teething period where they transition from 28 baby teeth to 42 adult canine teeth, your pup will gain some molars to help grind up/chew their food.

You may find a sharp baby tooth in your carpet over the course of this period; however, it is more likely that your pup will swallow the majority of their baby teeth while they eat. So, no need to alert the puppy tooth fairy!

Discomfort During the Teething Period

Just like humans, it’s common for your furry friend to experience a certain level of discomfort while teething. They may whine more than usual or chew on more of your beloved personal items. It’s important to do what you can to help ease their discomfort during this period; try to find quality chew toys specifically designed for teething pups.

Although it may be easy to get frustrated from time to time when you find that they’ve chewed up your favorite sneakers – again – try to be mindful and aware of the changes they are experiencing. Before you know it, your puppy will lose all of their baby teeth and your shoes will be safe once again!

[DISCLAIMER] Not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may have regarding the medical condition of your pet. If you think your pet has a medical emergency, call or visit your veterinarian or your local veterinary emergency hospital immediately.